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'L. bolanderi' (Lilium species or wild lily)

Lily Bulb - 'L. bolanderi'  (Species or Wild Lily)
Lily Bulb - 'L. bolanderi'  (Species or Wild Lily)
Lily Bulb - 'L. bolanderi'  (Species or Wild Lily)
Lily Bulb - 'L. bolanderi'  (Species or Wild Lily)
Lily Bulb - 'L. bolanderi'  (Species or Wild Lily)

'L. bolanderi' (Lilium species or wild lily)

LS11 $0.01

©2008, Robert J. Gibson. This page is for reference only, not as an offer to sell species bulbs or seeds. Click on 'Wild Lilies (non-hybrid)' to your left for currently offered species bulbs.: 




This rare and dainty beauty is native to the upper regions of the Siskiyou mountain range of Oregon and California. Receiving as much as 100 inches of rainfall per year, the rocky rubble and red clay soil where it is found growing allows water to pass through quickly. Enjoying a more open area, we found it most commonly growing amongst 'Hairy Manzanita' on north facing slopes, protected from the late scorching summer sun. Producing up to six, but sometimes nine, brick-red spotted funnel-shaped flowers, Lilium bolanderi rarely exceeds 18 inches in height. As with most Western dry land species, Lilium bolanderi can be quite challenging in cultivation.

We found the largest colonies of Lilium bolanderi within the boundaries of the Hoopa Indian Reservation in Northern California. Within about a 3 square mile area, five Northern California species overlap. Within these colonies can be found exquisite natural hybrids of these species. Photo is of plant in natural habitat.

The first inset photo is of son Doug working his way through the 'Hairy Manzanita' climbing towards his spotted goal of a lone stem of L. bolanderi to capture it on film while keeping in mind the nest of hornets he discovered the previous day.

Photo inset #2, upper right is from the collection of Bill and Mary Hoffman of a single stem of L. bolanderi as grown by Edgar Kline. We include it here because of its historical importance.

Photo inset #3, lower left show the habitat in which L. bolanderi was found by us on the Hoopa Indian Reservation.

Photo inset #4, lower right is of a natural hybrid of L. bolanderi and L. rubescens as colonies of these two species naturally overlap in some areas. This lily carried the red coloration of L. bolanderi and the upfacing trait of L. rubescens.




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Wild Lily bulbs making up the genus Lilium belong to the family Liliaceae comprising of approximately 200 genera made up of approximately 2,000 lily species. There are in the neighborhood of 110 to 120 Lilium species depending on whose classification you reference. For the full article, click Knowledge Base